Tic-Toc Maroc: Bonne Route

Half way to my next adventure, I’m both writing about the model year 2016 Yamahas as well as reading guidebooks for my next destination. Traveling this time to Morocco, a throwback in time, if not at a minimum, an entirely new world of religion and understanding for me. Not only will this be my first visit to the African continent, but also my first true endeavor with a muslim land. Calls to prayer were first introduced to my consciousness while on a film-scouting mission through the slowly rebuilding, worn-torn landscapes of Croatia and Bosnia-Hercegovina. First experience that comes to mind the woman standing outside a shop in Mostar. After snapping a photo of the alleyway in which she was standing, highlighting some graffiti on the wall, she began to panic. Fearing that I was scouting her outfit so that I can have her family killed, she approached my friend and guide, begging that I delete the photograph. Ignorant of why a photo would matter, and what she was saying I merely complied for the sake of my translating friend. Do I really looked like any sort of rebel? Wandering about town with my much-larger buddy, yammering on in English about craft beers and barbed wire fences… I think not.

People_ IMG_9694I cleared the photo for her, then spent a few bucks shopping in her back-alley storefront so as to make her feel like I was contributing to her family. I wonder now if maybe it wasn’t all fake, so as to bring us in as customers. We we’re 1/4 block away from her when I took the photo… lessons learned perhaps.

In Morocco, from what I have been reading, and with such high concentration of muslim population and yet their tolerance and history of welcoming travelers, I hope it’s much better for me in regards to comfort and photography. We shall see. Can anyone explain to me the muslim aversion to being photographed?